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Richard Porter

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Professor Richard William Porter (February 16, 193516 February 1935
13 Adar 5695 He
12 Adar 5938 AM
July 20, 200520 July 2005
13 Tammuz 5765 He
13 Av 6008 AM
) was a world leader in spinal research and osteoporosis, and a staunch biblical creationist. His obituary in the British Medical Journal[1] stated:

Professor Richard Porter was a highly influential spinal surgeon, with widespread interests beyond.
The first Sir Harry Platt professor of orthopaedic surgery at Aberdeen University, he held honorary professorships in China and eastern Europe. He was highly innovative and devised several new orthopaedic procedures. The publisher of many books and over 100 peer-reviewed articles, his major research interests were in spine and osteoporosis research. He won international prizes for this work, including the first Volvo Award in 1979 for work on spinal stenosis. He developed commercial machines to measure osteoporosis in old people and pioneered new ways of treating club foot in children. His theories on the causes of scoliosis are receiving increasing acceptance. He was the subject of three television programmes, including the BBC documentary Your Life in their Hands.

The obituary also noted his strong Christian faith and support for overseas doctors and refugees. In an interview with Creation magazine in 2002, Dr. Porter explained both his strong biblical creationist views, and explained some of the remarkable design features of the human spine, refuting evolutionary views.[2]

Prof. Porter was married to Christine for over 40 years, and they had four sons and 11 grandchildren.

References

  1. Richard William Porter, obituary by Daniel Porter, BMJ 2006;332(7534):182 (21 January)
  2. Standing upright for creation, by Jonathan Sarfati, Creation 25(1):25–27, December 2002
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